Andrew Breese

Musings of a professional geek

Tag Archives: Telstra

An interesting Broadband modem with mobile backup

The Telstra Exchange news feed has a good post last week – a new broadband modem product which provides a fast connection with a mobile backup in case the connection drops; called Telstra Gateway Frontier, also hitting the news on via Gizmodo and CNet. Firstly let me state the design of this device is far better than most modem/router devices, and if you want a better look at it’s physical appearance browse through the product designer’s website. Its a nice looking piece of kit. It helps that its not a black and grey box with 6 antennas poking out.

telstragatewaymodemwhitelivingroom

That is the Gateway in the background of this image sitting stylishly on the shelf (never mind that it has no power cable or phone line plugged into it, this is a marketing image), in use there would be a few cables running up from the floor to the unit.

Two statements in the primary article stand out as interesting:

If there is an interruption to the home broadband such as planned network maintenance, the gateway will automatically switch over to the Telstra Mobile Network within minutes.

… and …

Featuring the latest in Wi-Fi technology (Wi-Fi 802.11ac 4X4) to increase in-home Wi-Fi speeds up to four times compared with the previous generation of our gateway technology (when using AC-compatible devices), to significantly boost signal reach as Australians embrace video streaming on smart TVs and mobile screens.

Well damn, that’s actually useful.

Why? Well when I was a techie many years ago one of my proud achievements was cobbling together a “hybrid internet connection” for the company which attenuated two aDSL connections, a load-balancer for them, with one having dial-up backup for email, then plonked a few wifi access points into the network for the IT staff. That might not seem like much these days, but in the early 2000’s there wasn’t the choice in providers or flexibility in hardware we have today. My old solution from 15 years ago used three modems, a load balancer, two wifi points, a dedicated firewall device, a secondary firewall for a secure network, a router, and a server to control the policies and monitor usage. It was complex enough to need diagrams and many pages of configuration notes to run, and still had multiple points of failure. This Gateway product looks like it will have one box and three cables (power, phone, and lan), and so a huge amount of what I needed a patch panel and a rack space to do. I’m happy to see this in the home market, but can also see a huge potential for small businesses who just want to get online and stay online. Read more of this post

Telstra IP4 to IP6 mobile rollout – nice

ITNews has an article on Telstra’s improved capability to supply IPv6 addressing on devices on their mobile network – not revolutionary, but interesting because it demonstrates that they are genuinely seeking to move through to IPv6 and also putting material into the marketplace which is semi-technical and informative in nature. The IP address IPv4-IPv6 crisis was raised decades ago as a potential problem, and as a career techie I watch with interest when these things bubble to the surface in the general media.

As first spotted by CommsDay, the incumbent last month said it would introduce dual-stack IPv4 and IPv6 addresses on the Telstra.WAP and Telstra.Internet access point names from September.

Each device will be allocated a dynamic /64 IPv6 prefix, with access to the next-gen addressing scheme on Telstra’s network requiring further configuration on user devices.

Groovy. I like that. Many many folk bash Telstra, however if they do more network work, and communicate more about what the plans are and when they’re being deployed it will go a long way (for me) to gain faith in their wider capability as a premier telco vendor. Talking more about the technical issues and then extrapolating what that might mean to end users is useful – and for customers this means that the Telstra network will have breadth to meet addressing demand in the future. Internet-of-Things (IoT) is pushed in the hype cycle in universities, private companies, and the media – this means their mobile network should be “IoT Ready” (my words, not theirs though).

Something positive, lets get more of it.

…Disclaimer: these views are my own, of questionable accuracy, may be improved caffeine, may change with time, and are not representative of Telstra (duh), my employer (duh), my family, or anyone else…

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